The Unspoken Truth: Finding Inspiration In Black Lives

“Shout out to the people who haven’t felt okay recently but are getting up every day and refusing to quit.  Stay strong.” – Unknown

“Fill your life with stories and experiences, not things. Have stories to tell, not stuff to show.” — Anonymous

“The only bird that will peck at an Eagle is the crow.   He sits on his back and bites his neck.  The eagle does not respond or fight with the crow. It doesn’t waste his time or energy.

It simply opens its wings and begins to rise higher in the sky.  The higher the flight, the harder it is for the crow to breath and then the crow falls due to lack of oxygen,

Stop wasting your time with the crows.  Just take them to your heights and they will fade.”- Unknown

“Don’t fake your lifestyle for anyone.  It is okay to be broke, scared, lost, struggling, blessed, happy and grateful at the same time.  That’s life on life’s terms.” -Anonymous

“When someone tries to trigger you by insulting you or by doing or saying something that irritates you, take a deep breath and switch off your ego.  Remember that if you are easily offended, you are easily manipulated.” – Unknown

“There is light at the end of this road.” -Unknown

———————————————————–

My Dear Readers,

As usual, I will begin this blog by acknowledging those who due to COVID-19 are no longer with us.  Tragically, as of September 28, 2020, 204,033 Americans have died from this dreaded disease.  At the same time, 7,059,087 people have been diagnosed with 311,102 new cases occurring within the last seven days. And there remains no end in sight. 

These numbers have names and their lives have meaning.  They include Shirley Bannister, age 57, of Columbia, South Carolina, who was the chairperson of the nursing department of Midlands Technical College, and her daughter Demetria Bannister, age 28, who was an elementary school teacher. Demetria died several weeks ago, just a few days after testing positive for COVID-19. Shirley died on Sunday, September 27, 2020.

In addition to the devastation created by COVID-19 this has been a week of remembrance psychological impact and loss. In this writing, I want to acknowledge the deaths of four of these individuals and focus on one brave soul in particular.

In the Media-BLM:  Does Black Lives Matter?

CNN reports that a majority of adults–55%– said this month that they support the Black Lives Matter movement, but it is a notable drop from the 67% who said the same between June 4 and 10.

The report by the Pew Research Center show that “Among respondents who say they strongly support the movement, support dipped to 29% between September 8 and 13 from 38% about three months ago.” (CNN 09.22.20)

If the support for the BLM movement is waning, what does that mean for the overall support and concern by the dominant group for African Americans?  If one examines the dominant’s group’s history regarding the impact of macroaggression against black people, we know that those memories fade rapidly.

While the kind of domestic terrorism that brought America 9/11 and the Oklahoma City bombing of 1995 may be forever memorialized,  very little attention is given to the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama on September 15, 1963.  In fact, The Seattle Times acknowledged the act of domestic terrorism in a paragraph consisting of three lines, treating the tragic event as “un-noteworthy.”

Although minimized in media reporting, the incident is worthy of mentioning in this blog writing.

  • 14-year-old Addie Mae Collins,  14-year-old Cynthia Wesley, 14-year-old Carole Robertson, and 11-year-old Carol Denise McNair were killed in the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama on September 15, 1963. 
  • The bombing was the third in Birmingham, 11 days following the federal court order to integrate Alabama’s school segregated school system.
  • It is believed that the girls were intentionally targeted due to the 15 sticks of dynamite was planted directly under the girls restroom.
  • The bombing occurred at 10:19 in the morning and the resulting blast not only killed the four girls, but severely wounded 20 others church members.

Klan members were indicated for murder, but as later revealed, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover blocked their prosecution and shut down the investigation without filing charges in 1968. It was not until 2002, 39 years following the bombing, that the domestic terrorists were convicted of the bombing.

One World, Same Country & Two Realities.

Understanding & Knowing Your Place

In a homecoming reception in New Orleans for Black veterans returning from the military service in France during WWI, the following speech was given by a White city official:

“You niggers are wondering how you are going to be treated after the war.  Well, I’ll tell you, you are going to be treated exactly like you were before the war; this is a white man’s country and we expect to rule it.” (Barbeau & Henri 1974 p.174)

When I come across items like the motivational quotes shared at the beginning of this blog entry, I often wonder who the target audience is for such messages. I tend to question the relevance of these quotes to the life I live as a Black man and the experiences I have had while  “Walking the Landscape” otherwise known as Life. In this writing, I will restate the quote and apply it to the experiences of a Black man who continues to “Walk the Landscape” during these most difficult times.

In Plain Sight and Out of View

“I am the invisible man. I am a man of substance, of flesh and bone; fiber and liquid-and I might be even said to possess a mind. I am invisible, simply because people refuse to see me.” -Ralph Ellison

****************************************************

Quote #1

“Fill your life with stories and experiences, not things.  Have stories to tell, not stuff to show.” – Anonymous

Black people in America have had lives filled with experiences for over 400 years, and yet, neither our stories nor the “stuff” we have to show for that history have mattered. If my skin were white, would society hear the stories I have to tell?

However, my skin is black and because of the landscape I have walked and the experiences I have, there are many stories to tell and lots of things and stuff to show.

The experiences and things obtained in walking my landscape, my stories and my stuff although not important to many are important to me.

Black Lives Matter.

****************************************************

Quote #2

“Shout out to the people who haven’t felt okay recently but are getting up every day and refusing to quit.  Stay strong.” – Unknown

Excellent points, “shout out to the people…. and refusing to quit.”. 

However “Stay Strong”? Really? Absolutely not.

Young people, my generation was also told to stay strong. We integrated all white schools. We were kicked, spat on, hit, ignored by teachers. We were the brave bunch.

Every day brought a new battle, new psychological impacts, and more trauma. And our parents kept telling us to “stay strong.” We did not have the resources to balance these impacts that we needed, namely the resources, counseling, individual and the group psychotherapy opportunities that would allow us to navigate these obstacles while still supporting our psychological selves.

We came up during the time in which counseling and therapy was frowned upon and only for “crazy white people.” We still suffer in silence today, many of us still subscribing to the same self-defeating beliefs, continuing to “stay strong.”

Young folks, instead of following your parents’ road, littered with worn out bodies and devastation; create your own path. Instead of strength, seek balance.  

Empower yourselves by balancing your strengths and weaknesses. Before you get overwhelmed and shut down, reach out, allow yourselves to be vulnerable, exposed and trusting to seek professional help.

You decide… choose to focus on strength and holding it in, or create your own path on your own landscape.


Black Lives Matter.

****************************************************

Quote #3

“The only bird that will peck at an Eagle is the crow.   He sits on his back and bites his neck.  The eagle does not respond or fight with the crow. It doesn’t waste his time or energy.

It simply opens its wings and begins to rise higher in the sky.  The higher the flight, the harder it is for the crow to breath and then the crow falls due to lack of oxygen,

Stop wasting your time with the crows.  Just take them to your heights and they will fade.”- Unknown

I have opened my wings and have flown higher in the sky. And yet the crow is still on my back pecking away. Damn. How high do I have to fly before he fades away?

Apparently, he just being what he is … insignificant and yet an obstacle to contend with. Maybe that’s his message.

My message is simply this:  “We are not giving up, not giving in, and we are not letting go. 400 years plus one and counting.” Enjoy the ride, Crow, peck away. 

Oh, and about the traumatic experiences and wounding caused by the pecking? That’s what counseling and psychological assistance is for.

Heal the wound, create space for further traumas (i.e. more pecking) and achieve mental and emotional wellness. Keep flying.

Black Lives Matter.

***************************************************

Quote #4

“Don’t fake your lifestyle for anyone.  It is okay to be broke, scared, lost, struggling, blessed, happy and grateful at the same time.  That’s life on life’s terms.” -Anonymous

So, let’s assume that a large number of African Americans are ok about being broke, scared, lost and struggling…. does that mean that they are “at the same time, blessed, happy and grateful?”

Is this really “life on life’s terms,” or is this simply an illusory concept created on a foundation of warmth and comfort? Black people have been here for 400 years plus 1… and counting… yet, it is hard to find any that are broke, scared etc. and nonetheless, still feel blessed, happy and grateful at the same time.

Just because some people are slurping down the Kool-aid doesn’t mean we all have to drink from the same straw.

Walking the landscape on our own terms. Now, that’s living life on life’s terms.

Black Lives Matter.

********************************************

Quote #5

“When someone tries to trigger you by insulting you or by doing or saying something that irritates you, take a deep breath and switch off your ego.  Remember that if you are easily offended, you are easily manipulated.” – Unknown


“Take a deep breath” & “switch off your ego?” Really? And then do what? Black people have been taking a deep breath and switching off the ego for 400 years plus 1…. and counting. Black people understand what it is to be easily offended and manipulated.

Actually, those are “western or Euro meditation” movements that would encourage black folks to accept this supposedly Eastern philosophy which seems to offer “peace and tranquility.” 

However, what is really being offered here is a “carrot” on the road to “nowhere”. This well used road is littered with the bleached bones of worn out African Americans and devastation.

Instead of the “carrot,” we can choose our own path, that being one of advocacy, balance and calmness. The real question is whether we have belief, faith and trust in self, or do we continue to munch on the delicious carrot that is so willingly being offered?

Micro aggressions are here to stay, and so are we.

Instead of the “carrot,” mental wellness through counseling or therapy can be our path. You decide.

Black Lives Matter.

******************************************************

———————————————

Concluding Remarks-Dr. Kane 

“The road to hell is paved with good intentions.”

My Dear Readers,

The referred quotes are without a doubt well intended, meaningful and expressed with the intent to inspire and motive individuals.  But which individuals? What population? What experiences are being taken into consideration?

While well intended, these quotes, especially when used to address the pain that some individuals experience, can be psychological impactful and lead to emotional devastation. 

The last quote in its true “innocence” and well-being states .

“There is light at the end of this road.”

The question of “this road?”  Whose road? Why this road? Why can’t I choose the road that is best for me?  If one looks squarely at the quote it removes from the individual the “right of self-determination.”

******************************************************

Quote #6

“There is light at the end of this road.” -Unknown

Hmm Interesting. Good points. The major one being “don’t give up.” Now, about that road…this is where I choose a different way. Yes, for those who choose to follow it,  there is a “light at the end of road.” However, is there really a light? For me? 

My reality is simple. The road, which is spoken of, was built by somebody or someone else. To get to the end… it will be by seeking or meeting the expectations of those who built the road. 

Consequently, the light at the end of the road can become nothing more than an illusory “carrot” created to trap the seeker.

Young people, instead of following another’s road, create your own path. Instead of settling for the light at the end of the road, look beyond and “walk the landscape.” 

The landscape is open, vast and wide. More important, the landscape is “yours”. The landscape is LIFE. 

For many BBIPOC, the road is littered with the bleached bones of the forgotten and devastation. Have belief, faith and trust in self. Walk your landscape.

Stand at the crossroads. Make your choice.

Black Lives Matter

**************************************

Do Black Lives Matter? 

According to the research studies, support from white people is fading.  The bombing in Birmingham Alabama, which snuffed out the lives of four black girls, was an occurrence, not just in African American history, it is American history, which also has faded away from white public interest.

Yes, Black lives matter.  Black lives are no more precious than white lives or blue lives.  Yet Black lives have been under siege since they were brought here in chains in 1619.

Black lives have fought ALL of this nation’s wars and have protected this nation from its enemies….and yet Black lives have returned home to segregation, systemic racism and fueled hate. And still Black lives defend the Constitution that once upheld that Black lives are worth 3/5 of a white life.

During the women’s suffrage movement, Black women were consistently denied a sit at the table by White women who hypocritically were demanding their right to vote and full equality to men while at the same time denying the same rights and opportunities to Black women.

Black Lives Matter.

“To be African American is to be African without any memory & American without any privilege.” -James Baldwin

“If you are silent about your pain, they’ll kill you and say you enjoyed it.” -Zora Neale Hurston

“I say “Black Lives Matters” because “All” didn’t cover Black when they said “All Men Are Created Equal.”

I say “Black Lives Matters” because “ALL” didn’t cover Black when they said ”With Liberty and Justice For ALL”

I say “Black Lives Matters” because they’re still struggling with the definition of “ALL”

-Black Lives Matter Movement

The Unspoken Truth….. 400 years plus 1 and …counting.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s